Tag Archives: Occupational Therapy

COVID: Long-term respiratory effects of sedation

We know that patients who remain in the ICU due to coronavirus are more likely to suffer long-term physical, cognitive and emotional effects of being sedated. Researchers in Hong Kong have said patients who have recovered from the coronavirus can be left with damaged and low functioning lungs (20-30% less). Even though this is the case, patients can do cardiovascular exercises, to improve their lung capacity. 

Having lowered lung capacity can feel scary and at Covell Care we are here to help our clients who have recovered from coronavirus get that back. Our therapists can help guide clients through physical exercise programs, client and family education and breathing retraining.

Read the following articles to gain more knowledge on the effects of sedation during the COVID pandemic and contact us with any questions. (970) 204-4331

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20200609/COVID-19-survivors-could-suffer-long-term-health-effects.aspx

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/what-coronavirus-does-to-the-lungs

https://www.webmd.com/lung/covid-recovery-overview#1

Glaucoma & the value of Occupational Therapy

Glaucoma is a common eye disorder and there are more than 3 million cases per year in the United States alone. What is it? Pressure build up in the eye that can result in a functional visual impairment, impacting a person’s daily life.

Occupational therapists are in the business of function and purpose. They support people in most everything involved in a person’s day: bathing, driving, toileting, paying bills, working, home safety….the list goes on. The overall goal is to keep people involved and engaged in their environment, at home or in the community.

For people living with glaucoma, occupational therapy can offer modifications (i.e. equipment, lighting) for their home environment to make them safe, new techniques like visual scanning and tracking and training on low vision tools. But most off all OT’s look at things in a holistic approach to ensure people are able to participate in the things they want and need to do.

To learn more about occupational therapy and low vision support contact Covell Care at (970) 204-4331. We would love to share how we are impacting our clients’ lives.

Reducing Hospital Admission with OT

Thank you to our guest blogger Hailey Jungerman, Covell Care Intern and Colorado State University Senior.

Occupational therapists play an important part in keeping patients out of the hospital. They do so by encouraging safety in independence. One thing that I have heard repeatedly in shadowing OTR Dave of Covell Care is, “And we want you to be safe while doing so.” He is always referring to the daily activities of his clients and encouraging that they can do the things they want to, but making it more safe for the ability of the client.

In a journal about OT preventing readmissions, OTR Pamela Roberts and OTR Marla Robinson say that “19.4% will be readmitted within 30 days and 51.6% within 1 year” (254). This is important because it shows a need. We NEED to help in reducing this rate. They also state that OT has an important role in early identification of risk and early engagement in risk-reduction strategies (254). The earlier that patients start with OT after a hospital visit, the more likely that it will help in preventing readmission.

Roberts and Robinson state that OT can prevent hospital acquired conditions (HACs) and falls while in the hospital (255). Being in a hospital increases risk of fall due to unfamiliar environment and confusion. If a patient is to fall, then there is a fear of falling which can in turn lead to further disability from reduction in activity due to fear (Roberts and Robinson 255). This is why OT is so important in all settings of care. OT should be seeing patients that are high-risk for falls and hospital admission to prevent admission as well as in hospital settings and care immediately following a hospital visit to reduce readmission risk.

Another journal restates the importance of safety by asking “can the patient be discharged safely into her or his environment?” and if not that occupational therapists can look at 6 important interventions that can reduce readmission (Rogers et al.):
1) Provide recommendations and training for caregivers.
2) Determine whether patients can safely live independently, or require rehabilitation or nursing.
3) Address existing disabilities with assistive devices so patients can safely perform activities of daily living.
4) Perform home safety assessments before discharge to suggest modifications.
5) Asses cognition and the ability to physically manipulate things like medication containers, and provide training when necessary
6) Work with physical therapists to increase intensity of inpatient rehabilitation.

The only thing to be added is that therapists should work the whole care team to ensure safety and monitor success of therapy which may include occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech therapy, personal training, nursing, etc. Occupational therapy is necessary in assessing safety in activities of daily living. When safety is encouraged, the more independent a person can be and the less likely they will end up in the hospital.

Works Cited:

Roberts, Pamela S., and Marla R. Robinson. “Occupational Therapy’s Role in Preventing Acute Readmissions.” American Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 68, no. 3, 2014, pp. 254–259., doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.683001.
Rogers, Andrew T., et al. “Higher Hospital Spending on Occupational Therapy Is Associated With Lower Readmission Rates.” Medical Care Research and Review, vol. 74, no. 6, 2 Sept. 2016, pp. 668–686., doi:10.1177/1077558716666981.