Category: Treatment Options

Exercise and Centenarians

Thank you to our guest blogger Garrett Masterson, CSU graduate and Covell Care intern.

Nowadays, it is not unheard of for people to reach the golden age of 100 years. Medicinal, technological and health care advances have had big contributions to the significant increase in life expectancy. With the increase in life expectancy, comes an increase of age-related chronic diseases, as well as a need to preserve health. This requires measures such as eating healthy and maintaining an active lifestyle, including regular exercise. Regular physical activity is beneficial for a few reasons. It has been shown to help reduce the onset of diseases. Exercising regularly also slows down the documented decline in body functions as one ages. Studies have found the functional exercise capacity between the ages 50-75 to decline at a rate of 10-15% every decade. Evidence shows that a decline in physical activity leads to less blood flow throughout the heart and muscles, which can in turn lead to an increase of cardiovascular disease. Better health and less chronic diseases will help lead to a longer and more enjoyable life!

Surveys have found that only 31% of adults between 65-74 years of age report performing moderate physical activity 20+ minutes three times per week. Only 20% of adults over the age of 75 report performing the same amount of physical activity. Types of physical activity may include taking a nice walk through a park or walking through your local neighborhood. If going outdoors is not optimal, then maybe going into a gym and using stationary aerobic equipment is the route to take.

We at Covell Care have many options available for you, including gyms, personal trainers, exercise plans and much more! Contact us so we can further assist you in living further into the centenarian age! (970) 204-4331.

References: Venturelli, M., Schena, F., & Richardson, R. S. (2012). The role of exercise capacity in the health and longevity of centenarians. Maturitas, 73(2), 115-120.

Pelvic Dysfunction & Aging

Thank you to Guest Blogger and CSU Graduate, Hailey Jungerman.

Although many believe that it is a natural part of ageing, “age doesn’t cause urinary incontinence, age-related changes may predispose an individual” (Garvey 14). Not only is it not a normal part of ageing, but “more than 50 percent of older Americans struggle with incontinence” (Reinberg). It is important to understand that bladder and bowel incontinence is an issue that can go beyond just toileting. As owner Krista Covell-Pierson OTR/L, BCB-PMD points out in her article Are You Addressing Incontinence at Home? An OT’s Guide, “Unaddressed incontinence can lead to the following additional problems: depression, social withdrawal, anxiety, fatigue, increased fall risk, restricted sexual activity, increased expenses for supplies, higher risk of infection, and skin irritation.” All of these things can lead to reduced participation in activities of daily living.

So, how can OT help address incontinence? “Occupational therapists provide a comprehensive approach that looks beyond musculoskeletal skills deficits and recognizes the need for changes in performance patterns, such as habits and routines, while also considering the context and activity demands related to the problem. Additionally, occupational therapy practitioners have the background and training to understand the related distress and provide support for the psychosocial aspects of these disorders” (Neuman et al.).

Krista Covell-Pierson OTR/L explained to me what a normal plan to manage
incontinence would look like. The evaluation will touch on bowel and bladder health. Krista says it is important to look at both as the bladder can affect the bowel and vice versa. The therapist will discuss with the patient about their diet, toileting and leave the patient with incontinence reading material and a voiding diary. From there the rest of the sessions are working on finding the issue and working on the pelvic floor muscles. The therapist will work as an investigator to solve the problem. They will recommend small changes to see if that is helping, and work in stages as to not be overwhelming for the patient. If needed, the therapist can also use a
biofeedback machine to better understand what the pelvic floor muscles are doing and to get patients working them. Though the internal biofeedback is not required, Krista said there is about an 87% rate of improvement over those that do not do the biofeedback.

Incontinence is a serious issue that can lead to a decline in quality of life. It is the number one reason why people put a loved one in an assisted living community as it is draining on the patient as well as any caregivers. Getting the issue resolved can improve the quality of life and keep our loved ones home for longer. If you have any questions regarding incontinence our owner Krista Covell-Pierson is a great resource as she is Board Certified in Biofeedback.

Please call Covell Care and Rehabilitation at (970) 204-4331 to get more information or an appointment scheduled with us to address incontinence.


Citations:
Covell-Pierson, Krista. “Are You Addressing Incontinence at Home? An OT’s Guide.” 2018 National Patient Safety Goals: Communication | MedBridge Blog, Medbridge, 20 Apr. 2018, www.medbridgeeducation.com/blog/2018/04/addressing-incontinence-home-ots-guide/. Garvey, Kathleen A. “Toileting: Making the Most of Our Time in the Bathroom.” MiOTA Conference. 12 Oct. 2015, www.miota.org.
Neumann, B & Tries, J & Plummer, M. (2009). The role of OT in the treatment of incontinence and pelvic floor disorders. OT Practice. 14. 10-1318.
Reinberg, Steven. “Over Half of Seniors Plagued by Incontinence: CDC.” Consumer HealthDay, HealthDay, 25 June 2014.

How Does Our Mental Health Change as we Age?

Thank you to JaNae Gregg, UNC Student Volunteer and Guest Blogger.

The aging process comes with many changes for our bodies, but a common change that gets overlooked is how our mental health changes.  The change in our mental health can be misunderstood for the common physical changes that can occur from aging. Some of these symptoms can reveal themselves as lack of motivation, fatigue, and forgetfulness.  One way to be able to recognize when a symptom is cause for a mental health concern includes: stable intellectual functioning, capacity for change, and productive engagement with life. When fatigue and lack of motivation begin to interfere with how a person interacts within their daily life, then it could become a possible warning sign that they are suffering from poor mental health.  It is easy to misinterpret physical changes with mental health since the two typically go hand in hand with one another. For example, if a person suffers from heart problems or diabetes then they are more likely to develop poor mental health. On the other hand, people who suffer from depression and/or anxiety are more likely to develop physical problems that could include lack of energy, trouble concentrating, and memory problems.

Coping with the changes that occur while aging should be a part of everyone’s long-term lifestyle.  This could be done by expecting and planning for changes to occur (at any stage of life), maintaining strong relationships with family and friends, and a willingness to stay excited and involved with life.  By taking preventative measures to help mental health early on in life, then there is a higher chance of having better mental health in the future.  

Following these steps can be very beneficial for mental health, but sometimes the changes and loneliness that occurs with aging is hard to combat.  It is important to recognize if these changes reach a point of being too much to handle. The most sure sign of poor mental health or loneliness is when it becomes an interference to a person’s daily life.  There are a variety of ways to help decrease feeling lonely, these strategies include: staying active, look for new social outlets and contacts, make friends with people of all ages, continue to set goals and work towards them, and learn to recognize and deal with signs of depression.  Having strong emotional and social support are two of the biggest factors that can help with mental health; it is also associated with reduced risk of physical illness and mortality.

Mental health is just as important as a person’s physical health.  If you or someone you know suffers from a mental health disease or just isn’t feeling themselves, it is wise to seek outlets that can be beneficial to help improve their well-being.  Seeking counseling can be very beneficial, but there are many other ways to help improve mental health. Starting a new exercise routine, eating a healthier diet, finding a hobby, and being social are all great simple ways to begin to improve mental health. 

Contact Covell Care at (970) 204-4331 to learn about our counseling services for you or a loved one.   

Source: https://www.psychologistanywhereanytime.com/psychologist/psychologist_aging_and_mental_health.htm

Exercise as Medicine: Activity as Depression Management

Guest blogger Galen Friesen, Covell Intern and Colorado State University graduate.

Anxiety disorders are the most common mental illness in the United States, affecting 18% of the population every year. The process of treatment for mental conditions can be frustrating and extremely stressful; but a viable treatment option exists innately within every single person.

Exercise is always an option regardless of ability level, experience, or life circumstance. Exercise looks slightly different for every person, and can be tailored to meet individual needs extremely well. Public health recommendations for exercise (150 minutes hours to 300 minutes a week of moderate-intensity exercise [1]) have been shown to be scientifically effective at treating depression [2]. Analysis of 80 studies also shows that benefits of exercise can even be obtained regardless of duration, as long as a consistent frequency is maintained [3]. This means that something as simple as a daily walk can help combat depression, as long as it is a consistent practice. So if long concentrated exercise sessions are not a good fit for you, consistent physical activity is still an option, if frequency is emphasized.

The main takeaway of the relationship between exercise and mental health is that exercise is an effective and proven way to mitigate symptoms of mental illness and there are seemingly endless different ways to go about exercising, so there is guaranteed to be a form of exercise that suits each individual differently.

Sources:
[1] HHS Office, & Council on Sports. (2019, February 01). Physical Activity Guidelines for
Americans. Retrieved from https://www.hhs.gov/fitness/be-active/physical-activity-guidelines-for-americans/index.html
[2] Exercise treatment for depression: Efficacy and dose response. (2004, December 27). Retrieved from https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0749379704002417
[3] Craft, L. L., & Perna, F. M. (2004). The Benefits of Exercise for the Clinically Depressed. The Primary Care Companion to The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry,06(03), 104-111. doi:10.4088/pcc.v06n0301

Sacroiliac Belt

Guest Blogger: Colorado State University Graduate and Covell Care Intern, Garrett Masterson.

The sacroiliac (SI) joint is a very important joint in the human body. There are two SI joints which are located where your sacrum, the lower portion of your spine, and pelvis meet. This joint is very important, as it supports the entire upper body’s weight. If your ligaments or muscles around the SI joint are too weak and/or do not provide enough support, the joints will become destabilized. This can result in abnormal stretching of the joint/muscles/ligaments, arthritis, inflammation, stress and other pains.

A sacroiliac belt is a belt device that’s purpose is to help stabilize the SI joint. This device is worn securely around the hips. The belt compresses against the SI joint, acting as the ligaments and muscles in the area to help provide support. The belt also helps with realigning the pelvis to its proper angles, thereby helping to reduce the destabilization. Wearing one of these
sacroiliac belts can also provide your body with some relief and aid to allow the body to potentially heal and repair the affected muscles and ligaments that are required to have a healthy sacroiliac joint. This relief could also come in the form of reduced inflammation and lessened
pain which is commonly felt in the lower back.

If you are having concerns of SI joint pain and would like to hear more information about a sacroiliac belt, please do not hesitate to contact us at Covell Care. We would love to help you out! (970) 204-4331