Category: Resources

Vacuum Cupping as a therapy intervention

Vacuum Cupping, also know as Myofascial Decompression can be useful in the treatment of chronic overuse injuries such as bursitis, tendinitis, tendinosis, and myofascial pain syndromes. It can also be effective with post-op scarring and related pain.

So how does vacuum cupping work? Good question. This technique uses negative pressure to decompress adhesions, where the connective tissue is stuck and allow better flow for the exchange of nutrients. The pressure will increase blood flow to the area to help with healing process.

When it comes to massage therapy, cupping can most often allow for an area to release quicker then traditional manual massage. So results can happen fast! Great news.

Vacuum Cupping can help with the following:

  • Break down scar tissue
  • Break down trigger points and adhesions
  • Decrease pain
  • Improve performance
  • Decrease post-op/post-injury healing time

If you are interested in learning more or trying a session with cupping contact our office at (970) 204-4331.

Home Hazards…Are they related to falls?

A 2018 study titled, The Potential to Reduce Falls and Avert Costs by Clinically Managing Fall Risk, by Judy A. Stevens, PhD and Robin Lee, PhD, MPH estimated the prevalence of seven fall risk factors and the effectiveness of seven evidence-based fall interventions.

Stevens & Lee defined a “fall risk factor as an attribute or characteristic of an individual that increases the likelihood of a fall occurring”. They go on to say that many fall risk factors are potentially modifiable (e.g. poor balance, mobility problems, impaired vision, and insufficient vitamin D). Contributing factors increase the chance of falls such as the side effects of medications and the presence of home hazards.

Lets take a focus on home hazards. Most of us feel our homes are the place we feel most safe and comfortable. But does that mean our home is truly “safe”. Here are some questions to ask your self to determine where your home sits on the safety spectrum and some techniques you can use to enhance safety.

Can you safely enter and exit your home? 
Do you have stationary chairs with arm rests that do not rock or glide? 
Does every room have a night light? 
Can you read your medication bottles? 
Can you enter and exit your shower or tub without a loss of balance?
Can you transfer to and from your toilet without difficulty? 
Do you have clear pathways throughout the home? 
Are your kitchen goods stored between the height of your knees and your shoulders? 
Are you able to retrieve items from under your bathroom sink with ease? 
Do you have throw rugs picked up? 
Do you know how to use your microwave correctly? 
Do you remember to turn off the stove or oven when finished? 
Are cords clear from being in the walkways? 
Do you know how to use your thermostat? 
Have you been free from falling in the last year?  
Do you take your medication on time consistently? 
Is there a table next to your bed for a light and to set items on? 
Is your carpet and flooring free from tears and ripples? 

Home Safety Strategies:

  1. Remove all scatter rugs, repair frayed carpet, tape or tack down loose carpet edges.
  2. Arrange furniture to allow adequate space for safe walking between and within all rooms.
  3. When using oxygen, do not smoke or use an open flame.
  4. Do not overload circuits – unplug appliances when not in use.
  5. Wear close-fitting sleeves to prevent spills and burns that could happen with loose, long sleeves.
  6. Clean up spills immediately.
  7. Use a step stool or reacher to reach high shelves – do not stand on chairs or stools.
  8. Place safety strips or a non-skid mat in bathtub/shower and install grab bars – do not use soap dishes or towel racks for support when sitting or standing.
  9. Keep closet doors and drawers closed to prevent bruises or tripping.
  10. Keep walking aids within reach and keep a nightlight on or flashlight within reach of your bed.

If you are interested in having an occupational therapist conduct a home safety assessment in your home please contact our office at (970) 204-4331. And keep in mind, most insurance plans cover the visit.

The Potential to Reduce Falls and Avert Costs by Clinically Managing Fall Risk Judy A. Stevens, PhD,1 Robin Lee, PhD, MPH2

Suicide and Depression

Depression is at the top of the list when it comes to suicide. September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and Covell Care would like to bring light to this difficult and often too common issue.

Regardless of age depression can creep in. Depression can be caused by a number of different factors such as change in health, recent loss of a loved one, transition to a new place/home and financial issues. It is up to all of us to keep our eyes and ears open to what those around us are saying and doing to be aware of depression symptoms. That way we can help prevent suicide in our community.

Below are warning signs that the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention offers. What to Watch For if You Feel Someone is at Risk:

If a person talks about:

  • Being a burden to others
  • Feeling trapped
  • Experiencing unbearable pain
  • Having no reason to live
  • Killing themselves

Specific behaviors to look out for include:

  • Increased use of alcohol or drugs
  • Looking for a way to kill themselves, such as searching online for materials or means
  • Acting recklessly
  • Withdrawing from activities
  • Isolating from family and friends
  • Sleeping too much or too little
  • Visiting or calling people to say goodbye
  • Giving away prized possessions
  • Aggression

People who are considering suicide often display one or more of the following moods:

  • Depression
  • Loss of interest
  • Rage
  • Irritability
  • Humiliation
  • Anxiety

Don’t know where to turn? Contact Covell Care to learn about our mobile counseling services. We support people who struggle with depression, anxiety, grief & loss and much more. (970) 204-4331

Exercise and Centenarians

Thank you to our guest blogger Garrett Masterson, CSU graduate and Covell Care intern.

Nowadays, it is not unheard of for people to reach the golden age of 100 years. Medicinal, technological and health care advances have had big contributions to the significant increase in life expectancy. With the increase in life expectancy, comes an increase of age-related chronic diseases, as well as a need to preserve health. This requires measures such as eating healthy and maintaining an active lifestyle, including regular exercise. Regular physical activity is beneficial for a few reasons. It has been shown to help reduce the onset of diseases. Exercising regularly also slows down the documented decline in body functions as one ages. Studies have found the functional exercise capacity between the ages 50-75 to decline at a rate of 10-15% every decade. Evidence shows that a decline in physical activity leads to less blood flow throughout the heart and muscles, which can in turn lead to an increase of cardiovascular disease. Better health and less chronic diseases will help lead to a longer and more enjoyable life!

Surveys have found that only 31% of adults between 65-74 years of age report performing moderate physical activity 20+ minutes three times per week. Only 20% of adults over the age of 75 report performing the same amount of physical activity. Types of physical activity may include taking a nice walk through a park or walking through your local neighborhood. If going outdoors is not optimal, then maybe going into a gym and using stationary aerobic equipment is the route to take.

We at Covell Care have many options available for you, including gyms, personal trainers, exercise plans and much more! Contact us so we can further assist you in living further into the centenarian age! (970) 204-4331.

References: Venturelli, M., Schena, F., & Richardson, R. S. (2012). The role of exercise capacity in the health and longevity of centenarians. Maturitas, 73(2), 115-120.

Pelvic Dysfunction & Aging

Thank you to Guest Blogger and CSU Graduate, Hailey Jungerman.

Although many believe that it is a natural part of ageing, “age doesn’t cause urinary incontinence, age-related changes may predispose an individual” (Garvey 14). Not only is it not a normal part of ageing, but “more than 50 percent of older Americans struggle with incontinence” (Reinberg). It is important to understand that bladder and bowel incontinence is an issue that can go beyond just toileting. As owner Krista Covell-Pierson OTR/L, BCB-PMD points out in her article Are You Addressing Incontinence at Home? An OT’s Guide, “Unaddressed incontinence can lead to the following additional problems: depression, social withdrawal, anxiety, fatigue, increased fall risk, restricted sexual activity, increased expenses for supplies, higher risk of infection, and skin irritation.” All of these things can lead to reduced participation in activities of daily living.

So, how can OT help address incontinence? “Occupational therapists provide a comprehensive approach that looks beyond musculoskeletal skills deficits and recognizes the need for changes in performance patterns, such as habits and routines, while also considering the context and activity demands related to the problem. Additionally, occupational therapy practitioners have the background and training to understand the related distress and provide support for the psychosocial aspects of these disorders” (Neuman et al.).

Krista Covell-Pierson OTR/L explained to me what a normal plan to manage
incontinence would look like. The evaluation will touch on bowel and bladder health. Krista says it is important to look at both as the bladder can affect the bowel and vice versa. The therapist will discuss with the patient about their diet, toileting and leave the patient with incontinence reading material and a voiding diary. From there the rest of the sessions are working on finding the issue and working on the pelvic floor muscles. The therapist will work as an investigator to solve the problem. They will recommend small changes to see if that is helping, and work in stages as to not be overwhelming for the patient. If needed, the therapist can also use a
biofeedback machine to better understand what the pelvic floor muscles are doing and to get patients working them. Though the internal biofeedback is not required, Krista said there is about an 87% rate of improvement over those that do not do the biofeedback.

Incontinence is a serious issue that can lead to a decline in quality of life. It is the number one reason why people put a loved one in an assisted living community as it is draining on the patient as well as any caregivers. Getting the issue resolved can improve the quality of life and keep our loved ones home for longer. If you have any questions regarding incontinence our owner Krista Covell-Pierson is a great resource as she is Board Certified in Biofeedback.

Please call Covell Care and Rehabilitation at (970) 204-4331 to get more information or an appointment scheduled with us to address incontinence.


Citations:
Covell-Pierson, Krista. “Are You Addressing Incontinence at Home? An OT’s Guide.” 2018 National Patient Safety Goals: Communication | MedBridge Blog, Medbridge, 20 Apr. 2018, www.medbridgeeducation.com/blog/2018/04/addressing-incontinence-home-ots-guide/. Garvey, Kathleen A. “Toileting: Making the Most of Our Time in the Bathroom.” MiOTA Conference. 12 Oct. 2015, www.miota.org.
Neumann, B & Tries, J & Plummer, M. (2009). The role of OT in the treatment of incontinence and pelvic floor disorders. OT Practice. 14. 10-1318.
Reinberg, Steven. “Over Half of Seniors Plagued by Incontinence: CDC.” Consumer HealthDay, HealthDay, 25 June 2014.