Category: Incontinence

The Fear of Falling

Guest blogger Colorado State University and Covell Care Intern, Hailey Jungerman.

Falling can cause major issues for older adults. Injuries can range from an ankle sprain to a traumatic brain injury. These injuries can lead to high direct medical costs and indirect medical costs. Not only that, but it can lead to an increase in fall risk factors.

“Fear of falling often develops after experiencing a fall” (Tomita et al.).The same study shows that even one fall can lead to developing fear. There is a vicious circle that is associated with the fear of falling that can be hard to break without intervention. “Fear of falling is associated with negative physical and psychosocial health outcomes, including depression and
activity restriction” (Lee, Oh and Hong 2018). Once an older adult obtains this fear, the less likely they are willing to participate in activities such as exercise or even leaving their house. This can lead to weakened muscles and depression. Which in turn are more risk factors for older adults.

A team of therapists including occupational and physical therapists can help to overcome the fear of falling. Occupational therapists can assess the home for safety, both occupational and physical therapists can do a fall risk assessment on the client, and both can create a plan to address risk factors. They can suggest home modifications, address risk factors around the house, see how the patient gets around their home, and giving the patient exercises to build strength and work on balance. As the American Occupational Therapy Association’s page says, “Identifying environmental factors that contribute to falls and implementing the occupational therapy strategies to ameliorate these elements can improve safety and reduce health care costs while enhancing the participation of older adults in those communities.”

In order to keep older adults independent, it is important to have them assessed to find their risk factors. Each individual is unique, and so are their needs. Therapists working together can help to improve the quality of life by addressing fall risk in our loved ones.

For more information on Home Safety or Fall Risk Assessments call Covell Care & Rehabilitation at 970.204.4331.

Citations:
Lee, Seonhye, et al. “Comparison of Factors Associated with Fear of Falling between Older Adults with and without a Fall History.” International Journal of Environmental Research
and Public Health, vol. 15, no. 5, May 2018, p. 982., doi:10.3390/ijerph15050982.
Tomita, Yoshihito, et al. “Prevalence of Fear of Falling and Associated Factors among Japanese Community-Dwelling Older Adults.” Medicine, vol. 97, no. 4, Jan. 2018, doi:10.1097/md.0000000000009721.
Toto, Pamela. “Occupational Therapy and Prevention of Falls.” Aota.org, American
Occupational Therapy Association, 2017, www.aota.org/About-Occupational-Therapy/Professionals/PA/Facts/Fall-Prevention.aspx.

Is your bowel or bladder controlling you???

People of all ages live with bowel and/or bladder issues. Bowel and bladder dysfunction arise for various reasons: childbirth, prostate issues, a recent surgery, cancer treatment, lack of pelvic floor strength, the food & drink a person consumes and the list goes on.

There is even a thought that incontinence is just a normal part of aging. I am here to tell you that is not the case. Whether you suffer from stress or urge bladder incontinence, bowel incontinence or mix…You can take back your life and make changes NOW!

It is good to understand what a healthy bowel and bladder look like.

  • The average bladder can hold 2 cups of urine before needing to be emptied.
  • We should urinate 6-8 times in 24 hours, and have a bowel movement 3x/day-3x/week. As we age we may need to go more because our bladder shrinks but should not need to go more than every 2 hours.
  • Urine should flow out easily without straining and should come out in a steady stream.
  • An urge is the sensation you feel as the bladder stretches and fills. It does not always mean your bladder is full and urges should be controlled.
  • Your bladder should be completely emptied when you use the toilet.
  • Void positioning: knees higher than hips, lean forward and put elbows on your knees, bulge out your abdomen and straighten your spine (squatting position).
  • Holding your bladder for an excessive time (more than 4 hours) is NOT healthy for your bladder.
  • Don’t go to the bathroom “just in case” or more than every 2 hours.
  • Drink 6-8 glasses of water everyday unless your physician advises otherwise. When your urine is dark and has a foul odor, you may not be taking in enough fluid.
  • Avoid food and drink irritants. Limit alcohol! Alcohol actually increases urine production and also makes it difficult for the brain to coordinate the bladder control.
  • Too much sugar and/or fatty foods, a sedentary lifestyle, medications, ignoring the need to have a BM are all potential causes of constipation.
  • Avoid constipation by having a balanced diet of fiber. Gradually increase fiber intake to 25-35 grams per day.

Did you get all of that? Follow these bladder/bowel guidelines and see if anything changes.

Have questions about irritants or fiber? Join Covell Care for an intimate presentation on on this topic March 7th 11:30-1:15 (includes lunch!), next week at The Hillcrest of Loveland, 535 Douglas Ave, Loveland, CO 80537. Contact the Hillcrest with questions & to RSVP: (970) 541-4173. https://www.mbkseniorliving.com/senior-living/co/loveland/hillcrest-of-loveland/