Category: Counseling

5 Tips for Finding the Right Mental Health Therapist for Seniors

Thank you to guest blogger, Holly Clark, Freelance Health Writer.

Mental health is essential. No matter what age you may be, staying mentally healthy is extremely important, not just for your mood or happiness, but for the health of your body as well. Poor mental health may cause poor overall health, which is never a good thing. It’s not shameful to need help sometimes, and seeing a therapist is the best way to get the help you need. However, seeing a therapist as a senior may seem a bit daunting. This is especially true when it comes to finding one. Fret not, because it is possible to find the right therapist for you. Some tips to find the right therapist as a senior are:

Ask Your Doctor

If you’re comfortable asking your doctor, they’re the best place to begin. Your doctor may be able to refer you to a therapist that matches you. Many people will ask their doctors for a referral, so it’s not something that they’re unfamiliar with. Explain to your doctor some of your issues, and then ask if they have any recommendations, you just may be surprised at how helpful asking your doctor may be.

Use Internet Resources

The internet is a powerful tool, and it comes with a lot of sources for help. Do a few internet searches for therapists in your area, there are many online resources that list therapists and their locations, as well as specialties. Doing some shopping around also allows you to look at all of your options before choosing which therapist you’d like to try first. Remember, you may not like the first or even the second therapist you see. It’s okay to end the relationship and move on to another choice. Sometimes you’ll need to try a few different therapists before finding the one you feel most comfortable with.

Look For Your Insurance

It’s important to remember to look for a therapist that accepts your insurance. To do this, you can look through directories online, or even call your insurance company for a list of therapists in your area. Some will even let you filter your results by age and gender, allowing you to specify what sort of person you’d feel more comfortable seeing. If you have Medicare, this insurance does cover therapy, as well as many other insurance companies do.

Ask Around

It’s not shameful or even odd to ask your friends and family if they have any recommendations. You may be surprised at how many people you know that have a therapist. Asking those you trust and like most allows you to get recommendations that match your personality better, it may also ease some tension and fear when trying to choose someone who works best for you.

Consider Teletherapy

If you can’t drive, or you don’t have dependable transportation, it may be worthwhile to consider a form of teletherapy until you could figure something else out. Services such as TalkSpace cost, but they may ease one into the process of therapy, and they also provide an option for those who are unable to travel to a local therapist’s office. However, you may be able to have your insurance company transport you to your appointments at no extra cost, so it is definitely worth calling and inquiring about those services.

Jane Byrne, project coordinator at a nursing home in Kildare, notes that, “Seeing a therapist may seem scary, especially as a senior citizen, however, it’s not as terrible as you’d believe. Many people see a therapist and are much better off for it. Remember that it’s okay to need to talk about your problems, and doing so is a great way to become happier and healthier.”

Suicide and Depression

Depression is at the top of the list when it comes to suicide. September is Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and Covell Care would like to bring light to this difficult and often too common issue.

Regardless of age depression can creep in. Depression can be caused by a number of different factors such as change in health, recent loss of a loved one, transition to a new place/home and financial issues. It is up to all of us to keep our eyes and ears open to what those around us are saying and doing to be aware of depression symptoms. That way we can help prevent suicide in our community.

Below are warning signs that the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention offers. What to Watch For if You Feel Someone is at Risk:

If a person talks about:

  • Being a burden to others
  • Feeling trapped
  • Experiencing unbearable pain
  • Having no reason to live
  • Killing themselves

Specific behaviors to look out for include:

  • Increased use of alcohol or drugs
  • Looking for a way to kill themselves, such as searching online for materials or means
  • Acting recklessly
  • Withdrawing from activities
  • Isolating from family and friends
  • Sleeping too much or too little
  • Visiting or calling people to say goodbye
  • Giving away prized possessions
  • Aggression

People who are considering suicide often display one or more of the following moods:

  • Depression
  • Loss of interest
  • Rage
  • Irritability
  • Humiliation
  • Anxiety

Don’t know where to turn? Contact Covell Care to learn about our mobile counseling services. We support people who struggle with depression, anxiety, grief & loss and much more. (970) 204-4331

How Does Our Mental Health Change as we Age?

Thank you to JaNae Gregg, UNC Student Volunteer and Guest Blogger.

The aging process comes with many changes for our bodies, but a common change that gets overlooked is how our mental health changes.  The change in our mental health can be misunderstood for the common physical changes that can occur from aging. Some of these symptoms can reveal themselves as lack of motivation, fatigue, and forgetfulness.  One way to be able to recognize when a symptom is cause for a mental health concern includes: stable intellectual functioning, capacity for change, and productive engagement with life. When fatigue and lack of motivation begin to interfere with how a person interacts within their daily life, then it could become a possible warning sign that they are suffering from poor mental health.  It is easy to misinterpret physical changes with mental health since the two typically go hand in hand with one another. For example, if a person suffers from heart problems or diabetes then they are more likely to develop poor mental health. On the other hand, people who suffer from depression and/or anxiety are more likely to develop physical problems that could include lack of energy, trouble concentrating, and memory problems.

Coping with the changes that occur while aging should be a part of everyone’s long-term lifestyle.  This could be done by expecting and planning for changes to occur (at any stage of life), maintaining strong relationships with family and friends, and a willingness to stay excited and involved with life.  By taking preventative measures to help mental health early on in life, then there is a higher chance of having better mental health in the future.  

Following these steps can be very beneficial for mental health, but sometimes the changes and loneliness that occurs with aging is hard to combat.  It is important to recognize if these changes reach a point of being too much to handle. The most sure sign of poor mental health or loneliness is when it becomes an interference to a person’s daily life.  There are a variety of ways to help decrease feeling lonely, these strategies include: staying active, look for new social outlets and contacts, make friends with people of all ages, continue to set goals and work towards them, and learn to recognize and deal with signs of depression.  Having strong emotional and social support are two of the biggest factors that can help with mental health; it is also associated with reduced risk of physical illness and mortality.

Mental health is just as important as a person’s physical health.  If you or someone you know suffers from a mental health disease or just isn’t feeling themselves, it is wise to seek outlets that can be beneficial to help improve their well-being.  Seeking counseling can be very beneficial, but there are many other ways to help improve mental health. Starting a new exercise routine, eating a healthier diet, finding a hobby, and being social are all great simple ways to begin to improve mental health. 

Contact Covell Care at (970) 204-4331 to learn about our counseling services for you or a loved one.   

Source: https://www.psychologistanywhereanytime.com/psychologist/psychologist_aging_and_mental_health.htm

The Sandwich Generation: Caring for yourself while caring for others

Guest blogger Maya Stiles, Covell Care Intern and Colorado State Student.

Many caregivers may find themselves to be “Sandwiched”; not in a yummy snack but in fact something completely different. “The Sandwich Generation” is as a phrase used to describe people roughly between the ages of 30-50 years old who are taking care of a child, while also caring for their elderly family members. These “sandwiched” people can often find themselves being pulled in every direction by providing emotional, physical, mentally and financial support.

While caring for your family can be one of the most rewarding and uplifting things, it can also cause immense stress and take a toll on you emotionally and physically. In order to care for others, you must also take care of yourself. Below are four tips to take care of yourself while
caring for others…

  1. Take Regular Breaks- We often feel like we cannot spare a minute in our day, but if you break it down by 10, 20, or 30-minute increments; you find that it becomes much more achievable.
  2. Get enough Sleep- When life starts getting crazy, good sleep seems like the first thing to go out the window. However, in order to take of others, you must prioritize yourself. Getting 7-9 hours of sleep a night will ensure you are rested and ready to provide quality love and care to others.
  3. Laugh often- Plain and simple- laughter is the best medicine. Keeping things light by utilizing humor is a great way to release stress and take care of yourself and others.
  4. Be aware of Burnout- Taking care of others is a full-time job and can be even more demanding when paired with other jobs and life responsibilities. Everyone needs support, even when it is hard to ask for help.

Remember, you cannot take care of others unless you take care of yourself first. Keeping these four self-care practices in the back of your mind can provide you with some relief and support. However, If you feel like you need some extra support or resources please refer to Covell Care’s services and resources at https://www.covellcare.com.

References:
https://caregiveraction.org
https://www.caregiverstress.com/stress-management/
https://www.drnorthrup.com/how-to-care-for-yourself-when-caring-for-loved-ones/

What to look for with your loved one this holiday season…

The holiday season is a time of gatherings with friends and families, visits to your loved one’s home and hours upon hours of conversation. This is a time when you see a new perspective or maybe even see the truth behind the multiple phone calls or short visits that happen throughout the year.

Go into your holiday season with some insight to better understand your loved ones, their situation and needs. Don’t forget to pack the Aging Life Care Association’s ‘red flag’ list with you when you leave for the holidays.

  1. Scan & take mental notes about your loved one’s environment. Signs of damage in the home, on their vehicle, unopened mail, items placed in unusual areas, decline in cleanliness.
  2. Check out their food. Is there enough food, is it expired, notice any changes in weight (up or down).
  3. Has their mood or behavior changed in any way? Has their social life changed, do they have new friends, are they donating large amounts to organizations, is there an increase in confusion, are they walking differently or change a routine, are they irritable or withdrawn.
  4. Are they keeping up on their personal hygiene? Dressing for the day, showering regularly, do you smell urine or bowels, are their clothes clean, notice any bruising on their skin.

There are many other small pieces you can take away from an encounter with a loved one but here is a start. If you notice any changes and don’t know where to turn contact us for some direction. (970) 204-4331.

Wishing you and your family a happy, safe holiday season!