Trying Natural Alternatives: Acupuncture

Blog provided by JaNae Gregg, University of Northern Colorado Student and Covell Care Intern.

Keeping our bodies filled with energy and balance are two important keys to a healthy lifestyle.  Acupuncture is a healthy and natural way to cure physical or mental ailments.  This practice first began more 2,500 years ago in China and since has been used to diagnose, treat, and improve general health.  The main effectiveness of acupuncture comes from modifying the flow of energy in the body.

When acupuncture is performed, the patients can either lay face up or face down (depending on which points need to be used).  Then a single use disposable needle is inserted.  When the needle is inserted it can cause a sting or tingling sensation at first, then the needle remains there for five to thirty minutes.  While the needle remains in place the patient may feel a dull ache, but the treatment is relatively painless.   By placing the needles into certain points it brings the energy flow back into proper balance.

The best part of acupuncture is that it is all natural!  There are little to none side effects, it can be combined with other treatments, it can control various types of pain, and helps patients stay off medication.  Acute problems can be cured from eight to twelve sessions, while chronic may take one to two sessions a month for several months.

There are many misconceptions about natural remedies, but medications, surgeries, or other treatments haven’t worked for you, then give acupuncture a chance.  It has been known to not only cure illnesses, but to also prevent future medical problems from arising.  Using acupuncture can be the start of a new way to healthier and natural lifestyle.

The Benefits of Acupuncture

  1. Muscle spasms and pain
  2. Chronic back problems and pain
  3. Headaches and migraines
  4. Neck pain
  5. Osteoarthritis
  6. Knee pain
  7. Allergies
  8. Digestive problems
  9. Mood and depression
  10. Sleep problems
  11. High and low blood pressure
  12. Nausea
  13. Reduce risk of stroke
  14. Facial pain
  15. Vascular dementia

Physical Therapy as Preventative Care

Blog written by Kiara Tucker, University of Northern Colorado Student and past Covell Care Intern.

Preventative care is extremely important throughout your lifetime, but especially as you age. The aging process takes a toll on your body and makes everyday tasks become increasingly difficult. With a proactive approach you can lessen this impact by the use of physical therapy. Physical therapy will reduce the risk for injury by increasing your flexibility, strength, balance, and coordination. With increased abilities, you can regain your independence and maintain a higher quality of life. Another added benefit from physical therapy is you can stay away from more medication and reduce your pain naturally. The most common argument to physical therapy is the cost, but when you look at all of the costs for avoiding physical therapy, you can see that it is one of the more cost-effective options. If you wait until your pain is too bad, you will most likely not be able to fix it without undergoing surgery. The cost of surgery and all the medication that comes with it is typically far more than you would spend on physical therapy.  By waiting until surgery is necessary, your quality of life diminishes daily. Even after surgery, there can be a long recovery period. This is all in hopes that the surgery will be successful. The best option is to start physical therapy sooner rather than later when you feel your physical abilities are being limited.

Give Covell Care a call today to ask more about physical therapy and the benefits. (970) 204-4331

When should you stop driving…

A big thank you to guest blogger, Kiara Tucker Covell Intern with University of Northern Colorado.

It’s one of the hardest conversations to have with your senior parent but also a very important one: When should you stop driving? Most people try to avoid this conversation because they feel that it is best when their doctor or caregiver tells them it’s that time. Unfortunately, doctors and caregivers might not tell your senior when that time is, so it is on you to look for the warning signs to keep them safe. If you are lucky enough to ride along with them, it will be easier to tell when that time is. Some signs include driving too fast or too slow, improper lane changes, and confusing the brake and the gas pedal. They can also become very distracted while driving and maybe hit some curbs. If you are not able to drive with them, you can also look over the car to inspect for any scrapes or damage. But even if you cannot be near your senior, there are some other signs that will tell you it might be time to have the conversation. If your senior parent has arthritis, dementia, or any vision and hearing difficulties, they might not be suitable to drive. Another sign is they have hindered reactions to unforeseen situations. Although this might be a hard conversation, it’s a very important one because it will help keep them safe and others on the road. “Over the past year, 14 million Americans aged 18 to 64 were estimated to be involved in accidents caused by drivers aged 65 and over” (Gold, 2015). With this many people impacted, it is important to look over your loved ones and have that conversation when it’s time.

If you start noticing some of these signs, it is time to have that conversation and also time for an evaluation. At Covell Care, a certified driving rehabilitation specialist can conduct and evaluation that gives recommendations on driving retirement, retractions, and/ or compensatory strategies. We also provide occupational therapy services that can help your loved one with this transition. (970) 204-4331

8 Ways to Stay Healthy During the Summer

Blog written by JaNae Gregg, University of Northern Colorado student and Covell Care Intern.

Summer is right around the corner! And with that being said.. So is the summer heat. Summer is a wonderful time for to go for hikes, gardening, cookouts, and many other wonderful adventures that happen outside.  Unfortunately, enjoying these activities also means bracing the sometimes-unbearable heat that can occur.  That is why it is important to know the do’s and don’ts for a safe and healthy summer.

  1. Layer your clothing.  Yes, summer is hot, but many buildings have the AC on full blast.  By layering your clothing, you can stay cool outside, but warm inside.
  2. DRINK UP.  One of the important things to do during the summer is to stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids but try avoiding caffeine.  Caffeine is a diuretic and can deplete our bodies of the liquid that we need.
  3. Cool off your kitchen.  Heating up the oven or stove can increase the temperature in your home.  Instead of cooking a meal that requires the oven substitute a fresh salad, sandwich, or smoothie for a meal.
  4. Wear eye protection.  Too much sun exposure can irritate and cause damage to your eyes.  Wearing sunglasses can protect your eyes preserve your vision.
  5. Keep track of the time.  Enjoy your outdoor activities, but don’t overdo your time in the sun.  If you enjoy exercising outside, be sure to do it in the early morning or in the evening when the sun isn’t at its peak.
  6. Monitor the air conditioning.  Our bodies naturally cool down at night to help us sleep.  Instead of using the air conditioner at night, try opening the windows or using a fan.  This way you stay cool, but not too cold where it could disrupt your sleep.
  7. Sunscreen.  While outside be sure to apply sunscreen to any exposed skin.  Also, be sure to toss out last summer’s sunscreen and purchase a new bottle.  The shelf life of sunscreen is only a yearlong and expired sunscreen won’t provide the protection that is needed.
  8. Add Chia to your diet.  Chia seeds help absorb the water in your gut slowly and release it throughout the day.  This will help ensure that you’re getting the most from the water that your drinking.

Please use these guidelines to ensure a healthy and fun summer!

 

Is your bowel or bladder controlling you???

People of all ages live with bowel and/or bladder issues. Bowel and bladder dysfunction arise for various reasons: childbirth, prostate issues, a recent surgery, cancer treatment, lack of pelvic floor strength, the food & drink a person consumes and the list goes on.

There is even a thought that incontinence is just a normal part of aging. I am here to tell you that is not the case. Whether you suffer from stress or urge bladder incontinence, bowel incontinence or mix…You can take back your life and make changes NOW!

It is good to understand what a healthy bowel and bladder look like.

  • The average bladder can hold 2 cups of urine before needing to be emptied.
  • We should urinate 6-8 times in 24 hours, and have a bowel movement 3x/day-3x/week. As we age we may need to go more because our bladder shrinks but should not need to go more than every 2 hours.
  • Urine should flow out easily without straining and should come out in a steady stream.
  • An urge is the sensation you feel as the bladder stretches and fills. It does not always mean your bladder is full and urges should be controlled.
  • Your bladder should be completely emptied when you use the toilet.
  • Void positioning: knees higher than hips, lean forward and put elbows on your knees, bulge out your abdomen and straighten your spine (squatting position).
  • Holding your bladder for an excessive time (more than 4 hours) is NOT healthy for your bladder.
  • Don’t go to the bathroom “just in case” or more than every 2 hours.
  • Drink 6-8 glasses of water everyday unless your physician advises otherwise. When your urine is dark and has a foul odor, you may not be taking in enough fluid.
  • Avoid food and drink irritants. Limit alcohol! Alcohol actually increases urine production and also makes it difficult for the brain to coordinate the bladder control.
  • Too much sugar and/or fatty foods, a sedentary lifestyle, medications, ignoring the need to have a BM are all potential causes of constipation.
  • Avoid constipation by having a balanced diet of fiber. Gradually increase fiber intake to 25-35 grams per day.

Did you get all of that? Follow these bladder/bowel guidelines and see if anything changes.

Have questions about irritants or fiber? Join Covell Care for an intimate presentation on on this topic March 7th 11:30-1:15 (includes lunch!), next week at The Hillcrest of Loveland, 535 Douglas Ave, Loveland, CO 80537. Contact the Hillcrest with questions & to RSVP: (970) 541-4173. https://www.mbkseniorliving.com/senior-living/co/loveland/hillcrest-of-loveland/